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StormwateReport

By on Mar 31, 2015 in News |

February 25, 2015 | Crowdsourcing Water Data Technology is increasing opportunities for crowdsourcing water data. CrowdHydrology, a new phone application that debuted at the American Geophysical Union meeting in Dec. 2014, allows citizen scientists to report stream depths at various gauging stations and is run in partnership with the U.S. Geological Survey. The...

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An Army of Citizen Scientists is Tracking our Water Levels

By on Mar 31, 2015 in News |

Fast Co. Article by Zac Stone Crowd Hydrology—which started with just a ruler in a stream and a request to passersby to record the height—uses simple text messages to take measurements where the government can no longer afford to send people. Full article: http://www.fastcoexist.com/1682571/an-army-of-citizen-scientists-is-tracking-our-water-levels...

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CrowdHydrology Mentioned on National Public Radio (NPR)

By on Nov 26, 2014 in News |

CrowdHydrology’s biggest feature yet, the Morning Edition show on National Public Radio. Professor Chris Lowry needed to collect information on stream levels in Western New York but didn’t have enough funding for the traditional methods, so he turned to a more creative option: crowdsourcing. Guest host Linda Wertheimer speaks with him about his research...

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CrowdHydrology’s Work Featured in the Environmental Monitor

By on Jul 8, 2013 in News |

CrowdHydrology noticed by industry publication, Environmental Monitor. Chris Lowry’s idea was simple: set up staff gauges on local streams and leave a sign requesting passersby read the water level and text the data to a phone number. Data from text messages would be recorded and then posted to a website for public use. It was the beginning of CrowdHydrology, a...

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CrowdHydrology Featured in Iowa City Newspaper

By on Jun 30, 2013 in News |

CrowdHydrology featured in the Iowa City Press-Citizen. A University of Iowa researcher is hoping that the same tactic that sustains Wikipedia and helps trendy businesses think up new designs and campaigns will help him collect water level data. UI assistant geoscience professor Adam Ward is turning to crowdsourcing to collect data on three points in Johnson County....

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